Cari Noga’s debut novel, Sparrow Migrations, makes the case for reading more, and maybe even writing contemporary fiction. She makes multiple narratives and difficult stories look much easier to tell and enjoy than we’ve known them to be in the past. Get a taste of Cari’s carefully chosen words at her blog–we like this post about signs and her son, check out our Book Review in Brief or just ask Amazon for a free sample of the new edition of Sparrow Migrations. Trust us–it’s worth a read or few. What’s the last thing you read? (It doesn’t have to be a book, could even be the label on your breakfast cereal, I suppose). After a long wait on my local

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Cari Noga’s debut novel, Sparrow Migrations, makes the case for reading more, and maybe even writing contemporary fiction. She makes multiple narratives and difficult stories look much easier to tell and enjoy than we’ve known them to be in the past. Get a taste of Cari’s carefully chosen words at her blog–we like this post about signs and her son, check out our Book Review in Brief or just ask Amazon for a free sample of the new edition of Sparrow Migrations. Trust us–it’s worth a read or few. What’s the last thing you read? (It doesn’t have to be a book, could even be the label on your breakfast cereal, I suppose). After a long wait on my local

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This is an essay by Elizabeth Simons. Gazing winsomely from the cover of Growing Up, Russell Baker has an air of self-confidence with just a bit of vulnerability peeking through. Sporting his best suit and tie, with his hair slicked back and severely parted, he looks the picture of quintessential boyhood. The twinkle in his eye invites you to spin your yarns, and the truth will be sorted out later.

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This is an essay by Elizabeth Simons. Gazing winsomely from the cover of Growing Up, Russell Baker has an air of self-confidence with just a bit of vulnerability peeking through. Sporting his best suit and tie, with his hair slicked back and severely parted, he looks the picture of quintessential boyhood. The twinkle in his eye invites you to spin your yarns, and the truth will be sorted out later.

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Posted in Books, Lessons

This is an essay by Sheila Hageman. Reflections on Maya Angelou and Speaking to Universal Truth “I wasn’t thinking so much about my own life or identity. I was thinking about a particular time in which I lived and the influences of that time on a number of people . . . I used . . . myself—as a focus to show how one person can make it through those times.”–Maya Angelou   These are Maya Angelou’s words from an interview about why her memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings resonates so deeply with its readers. This is not a book simply about one woman’s plight (although it is

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This is an essay by Sheila Hageman. Reflections on Maya Angelou and Speaking to Universal Truth “I wasn’t thinking so much about my own life or identity. I was thinking about a particular time in which I lived and the influences of that time on a number of people . . . I used . . . myself—as a focus to show how one person can make it through those times.”–Maya Angelou   These are Maya Angelou’s words from an interview about why her memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings resonates so deeply with its readers. This is not a book simply about one woman’s plight (although it is

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Posted in Creativity, Learning

Harrison Scott Key is a funny guy. Don’t believe us? Check out this piece in Outside magazine. It doesn’t matter if you’re not a Southerner, and your father never forced you to crouch in a tree and eat cheap processed meat in pursuit of woodland creatures–Key’s true-life tales are hilarious, surprisingly relatable and may just make you grateful for (and more forgiving of) your family’s particular brand of crazy. What’s the last thing you read? (It doesn’t have to be a book, it could even be the label on your breakfast cereal, we suppose).  Technically, it was the question I am answering, which you typed into an email and which I had to read

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Harrison Scott Key is a funny guy. Don’t believe us? Check out this piece in Outside magazine. It doesn’t matter if you’re not a Southerner, and your father never forced you to crouch in a tree and eat cheap processed meat in pursuit of woodland creatures–Key’s true-life tales are hilarious, surprisingly relatable and may just make you grateful for (and more forgiving of) your family’s particular brand of crazy. What’s the last thing you read? (It doesn’t have to be a book, it could even be the label on your breakfast cereal, we suppose).  Technically, it was the question I am answering, which you typed into an email and which I had to read

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Posted in Author Interviews

Book Review: The World’s Largest Man by Harrison Scott Key Even the most reluctant memoir-readers will enjoy these tales from an even more reluctant southerner. His witty, but often uncomfortably honest portrayals of his family life and upbringing in Tennessee and Mississippi are sure to make you guffaw in public. The Gist:  The World’s Largest Man is a collection of vignettes and stories centered around the author’s father, Pop, a larger-than-life last-of-the-true Southern-men sort of character. Pop is the kind of old-school country boy who insists making his sons into “real men” through hard work, hunting, playing football, and hates the fancy neckerchiefs forced on boy scouts. There are hilarious anecdotes

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Book Review: The World’s Largest Man by Harrison Scott Key Even the most reluctant memoir-readers will enjoy these tales from an even more reluctant southerner. His witty, but often uncomfortably honest portrayals of his family life and upbringing in Tennessee and Mississippi are sure to make you guffaw in public. The Gist:  The World’s Largest Man is a collection of vignettes and stories centered around the author’s father, Pop, a larger-than-life last-of-the-true Southern-men sort of character. Pop is the kind of old-school country boy who insists making his sons into “real men” through hard work, hunting, playing football, and hates the fancy neckerchiefs forced on boy scouts. There are hilarious anecdotes

Read more

Posted in Book Reviews, Books