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The Memoir: Fictionalized Truth?

This is an essay by Elizabeth Simons. Gazing winsomely from the cover of Growing Up, Russell Baker has an air…

This is an essay by Elizabeth Simons.
Gazing winsomely from the cover of Growing Up, Russell Baker has an air of self-confidence with just a bit of vulnerability peeking through. Sporting his best suit and tie, with his hair slicked back and severely parted, he looks the picture of quintessential boyhood. The twinkle in his eye invites you to spin your yarns, and the truth will be sorted out later.

Book and Pen by Rakratchada Torsap at freedigitalphotos.net

Why I Engage in the Risky Behavior of Reading with a Pen

This article was written by Sarah L. Webb. I’m addicted to reading with a pen in my hand. So addicted, in…

This article was written by Sarah L. Webb.

I’m addicted to reading with a pen in my hand.

So addicted, in fact, that I have to have a pen even when I’m reading on my Kindle.

Not only am I addicted to reading with pens, but I’m also a pen pusher. My goal is to turn my adult students into pen users just like me (which is a lot harder than pushing pens to youth readers).

I wasn’t always this way.

Hollywood loves readers: The (sometimes) mutually beneficial relationship between books & movies

This is an essay by Chris Ciolli. Books and movies needn’t compete for our attention and affection. They’re two very…

This is an essay by Chris Ciolli.

Books and movies needn’t compete for our attention and affection. They’re two very different mediums, and they’ve got, as explained in an Williesha Morris’ earlier post , different needs and goals and use different tools to do the same thing—share a story with the world. In fact, although many readers and writers may loathe to admit it, movies and the books that inspire them enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship in which one feeds off and grows from the other. Less than convinced? Let me explain.