This is an essay by Elizabeth Simons. Running High and Low Creative nonfiction blends the thrill of a good story with already established facts. Crucial to good creative nonfiction is how the story is told,

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This is an essay by Elizabeth Simons. Running High and Low Creative nonfiction blends the thrill of a good story with already established facts. Crucial to good creative nonfiction is how the story is told,

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This is an essay by Sheila Hageman. Reflections on Maya Angelou and Speaking to Universal Truth “I wasn’t thinking so much about my own life or identity. I was thinking about a particular time in which I lived and the influences of that time on a number of people . . . I used . . . myself—as a focus to show how one person can make it through those times.”–Maya Angelou   These are Maya Angelou’s words from an interview about why her memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings resonates so deeply with its readers. This is not a book simply about one woman’s plight (although it is

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This is an essay by Sheila Hageman. Reflections on Maya Angelou and Speaking to Universal Truth “I wasn’t thinking so much about my own life or identity. I was thinking about a particular time in which I lived and the influences of that time on a number of people . . . I used . . . myself—as a focus to show how one person can make it through those times.”–Maya Angelou   These are Maya Angelou’s words from an interview about why her memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings resonates so deeply with its readers. This is not a book simply about one woman’s plight (although it is

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Posted in Creativity, Learning

This article was written by Sarah L. Webb. I’m addicted to reading with a pen in my hand. So addicted, in fact, that I have to have a pen even when I’m reading on my Kindle. Not only am I addicted to reading with pens, but I’m also a pen pusher. My goal is to turn my adult students into pen users just like me (which is a lot harder than pushing pens to youth readers). I wasn’t always this way.

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This article was written by Sarah L. Webb. I’m addicted to reading with a pen in my hand. So addicted, in fact, that I have to have a pen even when I’m reading on my Kindle. Not only am I addicted to reading with pens, but I’m also a pen pusher. My goal is to turn my adult students into pen users just like me (which is a lot harder than pushing pens to youth readers). I wasn’t always this way.

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This is an essay by Helen Woodward. The moment you hint at wanting to be a writer, people will tell you that you write fantastic letters and that you should write a book! Now there’s a thought. How many pages are in a book? Five to six hundred, give or take a couple. Do you write humorous or serious stuff? Maybe a “how to” pocket-sized piece of wonder or just a bloody good yarn. After all, if you’re going to write with the idea of strangers reading your work, then it has to either teach them something, make them laugh, cry or put them into shock with revelations you think nobody

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This is an essay by Helen Woodward. The moment you hint at wanting to be a writer, people will tell you that you write fantastic letters and that you should write a book! Now there’s a thought. How many pages are in a book? Five to six hundred, give or take a couple. Do you write humorous or serious stuff? Maybe a “how to” pocket-sized piece of wonder or just a bloody good yarn. After all, if you’re going to write with the idea of strangers reading your work, then it has to either teach them something, make them laugh, cry or put them into shock with revelations you think nobody

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Posted in Creativity, Writing

This is an essay by Brandon Monk. I recently stumbled on the idea of the commonplace book via Ryan Holiday of Thought Catalog‘s post, “How And Why To Keep A “Commonplace Book.” That post lead me to search Twitter for the popularity of the idea which lead me to two books by Richard Katzev: A Commonplace Book Primer and A Literary Collage: Annotating My Commonplace Book. As is the way of the internet, that led me  to Auden’s commonplace book, A Certain World: A Commonplace Book and by that time my head was swirling with the idea of  starting one of my own. I’ve been keeping something akin to a commonplace book in notebooks and online for a few years,

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This is an essay by Brandon Monk. I recently stumbled on the idea of the commonplace book via Ryan Holiday of Thought Catalog‘s post, “How And Why To Keep A “Commonplace Book.” That post lead me to search Twitter for the popularity of the idea which lead me to two books by Richard Katzev: A Commonplace Book Primer and A Literary Collage: Annotating My Commonplace Book. As is the way of the internet, that led me  to Auden’s commonplace book, A Certain World: A Commonplace Book and by that time my head was swirling with the idea of  starting one of my own. I’ve been keeping something akin to a commonplace book in notebooks and online for a few years,

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This essay is in two parts and was written by Elizabeth Simons. In case you missed it, here’s part one. Part Two: Make Room For Writing Writing is hard work. It’s so hard, I spend hours avoiding it. Sitting in front of a computer screen creates anxiety, so instead of composing words I play mindless games. Simple games to put me into a no-write zone until the Muse arrives. But she hasn’t been showing up lately. It’s all about time management, isn’t it? Some call it rhythm and settle into a routine. Some see it as rigidity and chafe against the perceived reins. It’s a mixed bag. But I’m getting ahead

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This essay is in two parts and was written by Elizabeth Simons. In case you missed it, here’s part one. Part Two: Make Room For Writing Writing is hard work. It’s so hard, I spend hours avoiding it. Sitting in front of a computer screen creates anxiety, so instead of composing words I play mindless games. Simple games to put me into a no-write zone until the Muse arrives. But she hasn’t been showing up lately. It’s all about time management, isn’t it? Some call it rhythm and settle into a routine. Some see it as rigidity and chafe against the perceived reins. It’s a mixed bag. But I’m getting ahead

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Posted in Creativity, Lessons, Writing

This essay is in two parts and was written by Elizabeth Simons. Part One: The Essence of Being a Writer In the third season of the overwhelmingly popular drawing room saga Downton Abbey, the imprisoned Mr. Bates receives a packet of letters from his beloved wife, Anna. She, in turn, receives a packet of letters from her husband. The last scene in this episode shows them, side by side, each totally absorbed in reading the other’s words. The camera juxtaposes the two images as if they were next to each other. It’s a breathtaking moment. This is the power of words. Human beings are born to communicate, to make connections. Words

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This essay is in two parts and was written by Elizabeth Simons. Part One: The Essence of Being a Writer In the third season of the overwhelmingly popular drawing room saga Downton Abbey, the imprisoned Mr. Bates receives a packet of letters from his beloved wife, Anna. She, in turn, receives a packet of letters from her husband. The last scene in this episode shows them, side by side, each totally absorbed in reading the other’s words. The camera juxtaposes the two images as if they were next to each other. It’s a breathtaking moment. This is the power of words. Human beings are born to communicate, to make connections. Words

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This essay was written by Christian Green. Sometimes you just have to take a leap of faith. You see, I’m trying to be a successful writer, but keeping the news to myself during this precarious early phase, so I won’t look too foolish should I fall flat on my face.  Sure, there have been plenty of acceptances. In fact, for two months now I’ve been making a living as a full time freelance writer, having been laid off from my manufacturing job last March. The Beginning of a Crisis I’m bursting with pride and an almost overwhelming need to tell the world all about it, but this urge is currently offset

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This essay was written by Christian Green. Sometimes you just have to take a leap of faith. You see, I’m trying to be a successful writer, but keeping the news to myself during this precarious early phase, so I won’t look too foolish should I fall flat on my face.  Sure, there have been plenty of acceptances. In fact, for two months now I’ve been making a living as a full time freelance writer, having been laid off from my manufacturing job last March. The Beginning of a Crisis I’m bursting with pride and an almost overwhelming need to tell the world all about it, but this urge is currently offset

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This is an essay by T. Lloyd Reilly. Pursuing a career at writing fiction has many obstacles and impediments.  There is the exhaustive grind of formatting for submission, the obligatory query where the writer must, for all intents and purposes, sell the idea to some secretary or intern at a publishing office.  The editor or whoever makes the decision to accept a story rarely reads anything that hasn’t been vetted by whoever is charged with the duty of culling the proverbial herd into chattel, maybes, and definitely pass on categories. Having experienced the joy of acceptance and the misery of defeat as a writer, I have discovered that much of it

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This is an essay by T. Lloyd Reilly. Pursuing a career at writing fiction has many obstacles and impediments.  There is the exhaustive grind of formatting for submission, the obligatory query where the writer must, for all intents and purposes, sell the idea to some secretary or intern at a publishing office.  The editor or whoever makes the decision to accept a story rarely reads anything that hasn’t been vetted by whoever is charged with the duty of culling the proverbial herd into chattel, maybes, and definitely pass on categories. Having experienced the joy of acceptance and the misery of defeat as a writer, I have discovered that much of it

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Posted in Creativity, Reading, Writing

This article was written by Anjali Amit. A lady walked into a milliner’s shop. “I have this party to attend,” she said. “I’m looking for a hat like no other.” The milliner picked up a roll of ribbon and wrapped it around her head, shaping and fitting as he went along. “Ah! beautiful,” the lady sighed. “How much do I owe you?” The milliner named a sum that had his customer gasping in disbelief. “But it is just a roll of ribbon,” she exclaimed. The milliner unwrapped the ribbon and gave it to her. “The ribbon, madam, is free,” he said with a bow. Writing is like that. Letters of the

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This article was written by Anjali Amit. A lady walked into a milliner’s shop. “I have this party to attend,” she said. “I’m looking for a hat like no other.” The milliner picked up a roll of ribbon and wrapped it around her head, shaping and fitting as he went along. “Ah! beautiful,” the lady sighed. “How much do I owe you?” The milliner named a sum that had his customer gasping in disbelief. “But it is just a roll of ribbon,” she exclaimed. The milliner unwrapped the ribbon and gave it to her. “The ribbon, madam, is free,” he said with a bow. Writing is like that. Letters of the

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Posted in Creativity, Writing