This is an essay by Chris Ciolli. Books and movies needn’t compete for our attention and affection. They’re two very different mediums, and they’ve got, as explained in an Williesha Morris’ earlier post , different needs and goals and use different tools to do the same thing—share a story with the world. In fact, although many readers and writers may loathe to admit it, movies and the books that inspire them enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship in which one feeds off and grows from the other. Less than convinced? Let me explain.

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This is an essay by Chris Ciolli. Books and movies needn’t compete for our attention and affection. They’re two very different mediums, and they’ve got, as explained in an Williesha Morris’ earlier post , different needs and goals and use different tools to do the same thing—share a story with the world. In fact, although many readers and writers may loathe to admit it, movies and the books that inspire them enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship in which one feeds off and grows from the other. Less than convinced? Let me explain.

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Posted in Books, Reading

This essay was written by Williesha Morris. “Ender, the enemy’s gate is down.” The double meaning wasn’t lost while reading “Ender’s Game” or watching the movie adaptation. “Ender’s Game” marks the first time I’ve ever purposefully read a book just before seeing a movie. I typically avoid watching movie versions of books for fear it would ruin my carefully, although not well-formed, visualizations of the story. Though I have a faulty memory, snippets of books like “The Secret Life of Bees,” “The Notebook” and “Cold Mountain” have not been tarnished by the dramatizations on the big screen, even though many of these movies have been critically acclaimed. I just can’t bear to

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This essay was written by Williesha Morris. “Ender, the enemy’s gate is down.” The double meaning wasn’t lost while reading “Ender’s Game” or watching the movie adaptation. “Ender’s Game” marks the first time I’ve ever purposefully read a book just before seeing a movie. I typically avoid watching movie versions of books for fear it would ruin my carefully, although not well-formed, visualizations of the story. Though I have a faulty memory, snippets of books like “The Secret Life of Bees,” “The Notebook” and “Cold Mountain” have not been tarnished by the dramatizations on the big screen, even though many of these movies have been critically acclaimed. I just can’t bear to

Read more

Posted in Books, Reading