The Art of Memoir Writing

This is an essay by Sheila Hageman. Reflections on Maya Angelou and Speaking to Universal Truth “I wasn’t thinking so…

This is an essay by Sheila Hageman.

Reflections on Maya Angelou and Speaking to Universal Truth

“I wasn’t thinking so much about my own life or identity. I was thinking about a particular time in which I lived and the influences of that time on a number of people . . . I used . . . myself—as a focus to show how one person can make it through those times.”–Maya Angelou

 

Book and Pen by Rakratchada Torsap at freedigitalphotos.net

Why I Engage in the Risky Behavior of Reading with a Pen

This article was written by Sarah L. Webb. I’m addicted to reading with a pen in my hand. So addicted, in…

This article was written by Sarah L. Webb.

I’m addicted to reading with a pen in my hand.

So addicted, in fact, that I have to have a pen even when I’m reading on my Kindle.

Not only am I addicted to reading with pens, but I’m also a pen pusher. My goal is to turn my adult students into pen users just like me (which is a lot harder than pushing pens to youth readers).

I wasn’t always this way.

Hollywood loves readers: The (sometimes) mutually beneficial relationship between books & movies

This is an essay by Chris Ciolli. Books and movies needn’t compete for our attention and affection. They’re two very…

This is an essay by Chris Ciolli.

Books and movies needn’t compete for our attention and affection. They’re two very different mediums, and they’ve got, as explained in an Williesha Morris’ earlier post , different needs and goals and use different tools to do the same thing—share a story with the world. In fact, although many readers and writers may loathe to admit it, movies and the books that inspire them enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship in which one feeds off and grows from the other. Less than convinced? Let me explain.

Writing About Writing: Five Noteworthy Stories and Poems

This is an essay by Erika Dreifus. A funny thing happened as I immersed myself in the study and practice…

This is an essay by Erika Dreifus.

A funny thing happened as I immersed myself in the study and practice of writing: I found myself appreciating stories and poems about writing—works in which central characters are writers or central themes or actions involve aspects of craft, process, or business of writing—more and more. I say that this is “a funny thing” because the more I hear from other writers, the more it seems that I’m in a decided minority in my enjoyment of these works.

Take the perspective articulated by Roxane Gay,